Press Release

EUTRICAL Repairing Shampoo

FOR FRIZZY, COLOURED AND CHEMICALLY TREATED HAIR

 

EU-Ristrutturante

It is a gentle product with keratin and sage formulated for hair that have been damaged by chemical agents during hair treatments like decolourization, colouring, curling or straightening, or by sun exposition, chlorine and salt water that make hair's cuticles less lubricated, permeable and dull. These conditions cause damages that result in hair breakage, split ends and difficulty combing of hair.
Keratin and sage perform a repairing and reinforcing action by protecting hair shaft from external aggressions and keeping it moisturised, nourished and strong.
They increase volume and leave frizzy hair smooth, silky, shiny and thick.

 

How to apply:
Apply shampoo to wet hair and scalp and gently massage.
Leave it in for a few minutes to soak in, and then rinse carefully with lots of water.
In case of long hair and chemically treated or coloured hair, Eutrical Repairing Shampoo acts as an adjuvant detergent in specific scalp treatments.
Some biofunctional compounds of Eutrical Repairing Shampoo:
• Lipoic acid: antioxidant and protective action
• Centella, malva, hamamelis and chamomile: soothing and replenishing action
• Creatine: repairing and volumizing action
• Bladder wrack (fucus vesciculosus) extract: softening and detangling action

EUTRICAL Hair Conditioner

NOURISHING AND DETANGLING HAIR CONDITIONER


EU-BalsamoChemical hair treatments, hard shampooing and brushing, the use of hair dryers and straighteners leave natural hair brittle, frizzy, dull and full of split ends.
Eutrical Hair Conditioner formula helps detangle, moisturise, soften and nourish hair. Hair appears easier to comb, soft, smooth and shiny, especially if they are damaged, dry, oxidised and chemically treated or coloured. 

 

How to apply:
Apply conditioner to wet hair after shampoo and distribute it evenly
Leave it in for 2-3 minutes or more for a deeper conditioning, and then rinse carefully with lots of water.

 

Some biofunctional compounds of Eutrical Hair Contidioner:
• N-acetylcysteine: strong antioxidant action
• Bladder wrack (fucus vesciculosus) extract: softening and detangling action
• Kiwi extract: rich in toning and reinvigorating vitamins

 

EUTRICAL Shampoo for frequent use

REBALANCING AND MOISTURIZING ACTION, FOR ALL HAIR TYPES 

 

EU-LavaggiFrequenti

It is a gentle shampoo, indicated for a daily use and for all hair types, also fair or fragile hair. It contains a high percentage of collagen and it is rich in vegetal active ingredients. It performs reinforcing, moisturizing and dermoprotective action and restores hair elasticity.

 

How to apply:
Apply shampoo to wet hair and scalp and gently massage.
Leave it in for a few minutes to increase the moisturising action, and then rinse carefully with lots of water.
It is indicated as an adjuvant detergent in specific scalp treatments and it offers a gentler alternative to specific hair treatments in case of weekly hair washing.

 

Some biofunctional compounds of Eutrical Shampoo for frequent use:
• Collagen: moisturising action
• Aloe vera, hamamelis, malva and chamomile: moisturising, soothing, repairing, toning and anti-inflammatory action, it enhances microcirculation

EUTRICAL Soothing Scalp Oil

 

FOR IRRITATED SCALP 

 

EU-OlioLenitivo

It is a rebalancing hair oil treatment for irritated and sore scalp causing excessive sebum production and flacking scalp skin
It performs a calming, soothing, decongestant and normalizing action and contrasts scalp irritation and itchiness that provoke redness and thinning scalp.
How to apply:
Distribute it evenly on red and irritated scalp areas and rub gently.
Leave it in for at least 5 minutes or, if necessary, all night long and then remove it with a suitable cleanser.
Apply it a few times per week or every night, when necessary.

 

Some biofunctional compounds of Eutrical Soothing Scalp Oil:
• Alpha-Bisabolol: calming, soothing and softening action
• 18-Beta-Glycyrrhetinic acid
• Chamomile: soothing and dermoprotective action
• Calendula: detox and softening action
• Greater burdock: sebum-balancing and dermo-purifying action
• Pygeum africanum and Serenoa repens (saw palmetto): stimulating and sebo-regulating action
• Aloe Vera: nourishing, moisturising and repairing action
• Vitamin E: antioxidant action

 

EUTRICAL Greasy Hair Shampoo

SEBUM-BALANCING ACTION

 

EU-CapelliGrassi

Sebaceous glands on scalp secrete natural oil called sebum. Sebum helps to protect the scalp while also coating the hair.
Stress, pollution, hormonal imbalances and lifestyle changes may lead to the sebaceous glands being overactive, causing excess sebum production.
Consequently, hair becomes greasy, oily, flat and easily dirty.
Eutrical Greasy Hair Shampoo cleanses and restores scalp's natural balance normalising excessive sebum secretion and making hair clean, shine and fluffy for a longer time.

 

How to apply:
Apply it to wet hair and scalp one or twice a week and massage gently.
Leave it in for a few minutes, and then rinse carefully with lots of water.
In case of frequent shampooing, alternate it with Eutrical Shampoo for frequent use or Eutrical Repairing Shampoo.
In case of long or treated hair, cleanse hair with Eutrical Shampoo for frequent use or Eutrical Repairing Shampoo.

 

Some biofunctional compounds of Eutrical Greasy Hair Shampoo:
• Azeloglicina: sebum-normalizing and moisturising action, it improves hair elasticity
• Biozolfo: sebum-normalizing action

EUTRICAL Anti-Dandruff Shampoo

ANTI-DANDRUFF SHAMPOO 
 

EU-AntiForfora

Dandruff is an excessive scalp desquamation; cell renewal usually occurs every 21-28 days, but in the case of people suffering from dandruff, the epidermal cell turnover is faster, about 10 days, causing the desquamation of the scalp skin.
Eutrical Anti-Dandruff Shampoo is an anti-desquamation treatment indicated for dry or oily dandruff, both itchy and not itchy.
It restores scalp's natural balance and removes dandruff completely from the hair, performing soothing and normalising action.

 

How to apply:
Apply it to wet hair and scalp one or twice a week and massage gently.
Leave it in for a few minutes, then rinse carefully with lots of water.
In case of frequent shampooing, alternate it with Eutrical Shampoo for frequent use or Eutrical Repairing Shampoo.
In case of long or treated hair, cleanse hair with Eutrical Shampoo for frequent use or Eutrical Repairing Shampoo.

 

Some biofunctional compounds of Eutrical Anti-Dandruff Shampoo:
• Zinc pyrithione: removes scalp desquamation
• Climbazole: contrasts the proliferation of microorganisms

EUTRICAL Dietary Supplement

THE COMPLETE SYNERGISTIC DAILY SUPPLEMENT 

 

EU-Capsule2

A serious trichologic program always takes into consideration nutritional supplement.
Food disorders, unbalanced diets, seasonal changes, UV rays exposition, pollution, smoke, hormonal imbalances, lifestyle changes may induce hair loss or alter hair growth.
Eutrical natural dietary supplement contains a selection of functional compounds that works in synergy with Eutrical Active & Intensive Anti Hair Loss Lotion and Eutrical Anti Hair Loss Shampoo in order to supply the organism with those precious and essential nutritional compounds able to reduce hair fall and increase hair volume and shine. It also contrasts the generation of noxious free radicals by performing an antioxidant action that improves also the structure of nails.

 

Suggested dosage:
Take 2 pills in the morning.
Do not take more than the dosage recommended.

 

Some biofunctional compounds of Eutrical Dietary Supplement:
• Cystine: helps increase keratin resistance
• L-Methionine: antioxidant action, it helps produce keratin
• Millet: rich in minerals, 11 amino acids, vitamin B1 and vitamin B2
• Vitis bicomplex: antioxidant action, it increases microcirculation and induces the anagen (active growth) phase
• Ginseng: repairing action, it enhances microcirculation
• Serenoa repens: stimulating and sebo-regulating action
• L-carnosine: increases cellular energy production
• Acetyl Carnitine: increases cellular metabolism
• Fermented papaya: antioxidant action
• Red Orange Complex: antioxidant and protective action

EUTRICAL Anti Hair Loss Shampoo

SCALP CLEANSER FORMULATED WITH PLANT EXTRACTS, INDICATED FOR BRITTLE HAIR AND GENETIC PREDISPOSITION TO HAIR LOSS 

 

EU-AntiCaduta

It cleanses and regulates hair loss reinforcing hair structure, restoring scalp's natural balance and enhancing hair elasticity, resistance to breakage and volume.

Biofunctional compounds work in synergy with Eutrical Active & Intensive Anti Hair Loss Lotion.
Use the shampoo as adjuvant to hair regrowth treatments in case of brittle hair and thinning hair.

 

How to apply:
Apply shampoo to wet hair and scalp and gently massage, leave it for a few minutes, then rinse carefully with lots of water

 

Some biofunctional compounds of Eutrical Anti Hair Loss Shampoo:
• Glycosaminoglycans: increases cellular regeneration
• Anise essential oil: enhances hair growth
• Collagen: moisturising action

EUTRICAL Intensive Anti Hair Loss Lotion

HAIR AND SCALP LOTION FORMULATED WITH PLANT EXTRACTS, INDICATED FOR INTENSIVE HAIR LOSS AND NON-SEASONAL HAIR LOSS 

 

EU-LozioneIntensiveAntiCaduta

Hair and scalp lotion formulated to contrast hair weakening, hair thinning and weak hair growth processes. It nourishes hair improving hair's strength and growth.
It enhances local microcirculation and cellular regeneration contrasting the premature ageing of the hair bulb by anchoring it to the scalp.
The complex of biofunctional compounds contained in the lotion stimulates hair follicle cells and controls hair life cycle contrasting the miniaturization of hair follicles* and stimulating them to produce stronger and healthier hair during every hair cycle.
The hair lotion does not act on completely atrophied hair follicles that are no longer able to produce new hair.
Eutrical Intensive Anti Hair Loss Lotion is a water-based alcohol-free product.
*"Miniaturization" is a biological process that causes the progressive thinning of hair. Hair become thinner and shorter until it leads to the appearance of hair loss.

 

How to apply:
Apply 2-4 ml of anti-hair loss lotion, equal to 1 or 2 pipettes, on wet or dry hair every night. Proceed with a specific massage to the affected areas of the scalp to increase the skin's absorption.
Apply it until necessary to restore scalp's natural balance and increase hair’s strength and elasticity.
Use Eutrical Active Anti Hair Loss Lotion for the maintenance treatment.

 

Some biofunctional compounds of Eutrical Intensive Anti Hair Loss Lotion:
• Sophora flavescens: stimulates hair growth
• Polygonum multi forum: promotes hair growth by inducing anagen phase and increases cellular regeneration
• Ginseng: repairing action, it enhances microcirculation
• Melatonin: induces anagen phase, restores scalp's balance and decreases UV rays exposition damages.
• Nettle and Pygeum africanum: revitalising, antioxidant and stimulating action, it helps remineralization
• Vitis bicomplex: antioxidant action, it increases microcirculation and induces the anagen (active growth) phase
• L-carnosine and Acetyl-L-carnitine: increase cellular energy production
• Arginine: repairing action, it increases the epithelial tissue growth
• Fish oil: contrasts hair loss
• Angelica sinensis: stimulates hair bulb cells

Other compounds:
Glycyrrhiza, Dioscorea opposita, Psoralea corylifolia, Red Orange Complex, Glycosaminoglycans: antioxidant, protective, stimulating and energizing action.

EUTRICAL Active Anti Hair Loss Lotion

HAIR AND SCALP LOTION FORMULATED WITH PLANT EXTRACTS, INDICATED FOR WEAK SEASONAL HAIR LOSS AND HAIR MAINTEINANCE TREATMENT 

 

EU-LozioneActiveAntiCaduta

It is a cosmetic product formulated for weak hair loss and seasonal hair loss and for the hair maintenance treatment after using Eutrical Intensive Anti Hair Loss Lotion.
Lotion's biofunctional compounds reinforce, stimulate and support the physiological processes that increase hair growth and natural hair extension; they enhance hair follicle to produce thicker hair by nourishing the skin and rebalancing the scalp.
Eutrical Active Anti Hair Loss Lotion is a water-based alcohol-free product.

 

How to apply:
Apply 2-4 ml of anti-hair loss lotion, equal to 1 or 2 pipettes, on wet or dry hair every night. Proceed with a specific massage to the affected areas of the scalp to increase the skin's absorption.
Apply it until necessary to stabilize the results in order to keep hair follicle healthy and productive.

 

Some biofunctional compounds of Eutrical Active Anti Hair Loss Lotion:
• Angelica sinensis: stimulates hair bulb cells
• Sophora flavescens: stimulates hair growth
• Polygonum multi forum: promotes hair growth by inducing anagen phase and increases cellular regeneration
• Discorea opposita: thickening action, it increases cell tropism
• Psoralea corylifolia: antioxidant action, it helps the tropism of the hair bulb and enhances the supply of nutrients
• Glycyrrhiza glabra: enhances the metabolic activity of hair-bulb cells
• Chamomile essential oil: soothing, antioxidant and dermoprotective action

INTIMiO Intimate Detergent pH 7

 

NEUTRAL INTIMATE DETERGENT FORMULATED FOR MENOPAUSE AND PUBERTY, WITH PURE SWEET ALMOND OIL AND ORGANIC LYCOPENE. FREE FROM WATER, LES AND PRESERVATIVES, NICKEL TESTED, SOOTHING, MOISTURIZING AND REFRESHING ACTION, FOR DAILY USE


intimio det7

Intimate detergent with oil-based natural active principles, water-free, ultra-gentle, formulated with a 50% concentration of sweet almond oil and natural surfactants. It is a non-irritant cleanser that does not alter hydro-lipid balance and contrasts dryness, burning sensation, redness and intimate itching caused by hormonal changes, menopause, stress, lactation, pharmacological treatments and use of hormonal contraceptive. INTIMiO restores and replenishes lost moisture, enhancing the skin's natural protective layer. It is enriched with antioxidant organic lycopene encapsulated in wheat cerasomes to moisturise, protect and prevent skin ageing.

 

Natural active compounds:
• Sweet almond oil: moisturising, softening and soothing action
• Wheat germ oil: soothing, protecting and repairing action
• Organic lycopene encapsulated in wheat cerasomes: soothing, moisturising and antioxidant action, it improves skin elasticity and prevents skin ageing
• Oil-based surfactants: ultra-gentle, it has a non-irritating cleansing action and it does not alter the skin's hydro-lipid balance

 

INTIMiO Intimate Detergent pH 3.5

 

INTIMATE DETERGENT WITH A NATURAL ANTIBACTERIAL ACTION, ACIDITY PH 3.5


DAILY INTIMAGE CARE, FORMULATED FOR CHILDBEARING AGE, MENSTRUAL PERIOD, PREGNANCY AND POSTPARTUM, SUITABLE WHEN TRAVELLING OR AT GYMNASIUM, WITH PURE SWEET ALMOND OIL AND ORGANIC LYCOPENE, FREE FROM WATER, LES AND PRESERVATIVES, NICKEL TESTED, ANTIBACTERIAL ACTION, FOR A DAILY BALANCE


intimio det35Intimate oil-detergent for a daily use, water-free, ultra-gentle, formulated with sweet almond oil and natural surfactants. It is a non-irritant cleanser that does not alter hydro-lipid balance during childbearing age. It has a natural antibacterial action to protect skin from bacteria and skin fungus during extremely delicate physiological conditions. It is recommended to prevent infections, for example during menstrual period, pregnancy and post-partum, when travelling or at gymnasium and to contrast skin and mucosal irritation by protecting natural defences. It is enriched with antioxidant organic lycopene encapsulated in wheat cerasomes to moisturise, protect and prevent skin ageing

 

Natural active ingredients:
• Sweet almond oil: moisturising, smoothing and soothing action, it improves skin elasticity
• Wheat germ oil: soothing, protecting and repairing action
• Tea Tree Oil (Melaleuca Alternifolia essential oil): antiseptic, antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral and strong deodorant action
• Organic lycopene encapsulated in wheat cerasomes: soothing, smoothing and antioxidant action, it improves skin elasticity and prevents skin ageing
• Oil-based surfactants: ultra-gentle, it has a non-irritating cleansing action and it does not alter skin's hydro-lipid balance

 

INTIMIO Intimate Lubricant Cream

 

IT RELIEVES VAGINAL DRYNESS

 

intimio crema

Insufficient natural lubrication can be caused by different factors. Women can suffer from vaginal dryness even during puberty: for example, the action of putting in a tampon during the menstrual period can cause pain or uncomfortable due to insufficient lubrication.
Hormonal changes, a new lifestyle and different habits during pregnancy and lactation may interfere with women sexuality by reducing secretion.
But it is during menopause that most women experience the problem more intensely. That is because woman’s reproductive capacity is lost and a series of physiological changes occur.
At around the age of 50-55 years old, vaginal mucosa tails off causing vaginal dryness. Loss of libido or sexual desire is often linked not only to hormonal changes but also to vaginal dryness and intense pain or burning sensation during intercourse. Lack of lubrication – vaginal dryness – during sexual activity makes sex less enjoyable, sometimes even painful, and followed by vaginal burning, redness and itching. That is why it is important to use lubricant. INTIMiO Lubricant cream is a smoothing cream that is dermatologically tested for external mucosa and formulated with natural active principles specifics for vaginal dryness. It has a soothing and protective action, it prevents free radicals, it is refreshing and enhances mucosa elasticity and a therapeutic rehabilitation of the pelvic floor. It is enriched with organic lycopene encapsulated in wheat cerasomes, a natural antioxidant able to moisturize, protect and prevent skin ageing.

 

Natural active compounds:
• Aloe Vera (Aloe Barbadensis): smoothing, moisturising and soothing action
• Sweet almond oil: softening and moisturizing action, it improves skin elasticity
• Olive oil: repairing and nourishing action, it prevents skin dryness
• Organic Lycopene encapsulated in wheat cerasomes: soothing, moisturizing and antioxidant action, it improves skin elasticity and prevents skin ageing

 

Naturmio WOMAN

 

NATURMiO Menopause

 

naturmio donna

DIETARY SUPPLEMENT FOR MENOPAUSE, with organic lycopene
When going through menopause and pre-menopause, woman will start experiencing troublesome symptoms caused by a decreasing level of oestrogens.
Hot flashes and excessive sweating are among the most common symptoms of menopause, accompanied by insomnia that also contributes during the time to cause anxiety irritability and sometimes even depression.
Lower oestrogen levels can also lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and accelerate bone demineralization (osteoporosis) because oestrogens increase intestinal calcium absorption and bone mineralization.
NATURMiO Menopause is a special dietary supplement formulated to:

- decrease neurovegetative disorders (hot flushes, excessive sweating, irritability and aggressiveness, erratic mood swings)

- decrease cardiovascular risks (reducing blood lipid levels, cholesterol and hypertension) and prevent osteoarticular diseases

 

NATURNiO Menopause is also used to prevent uterine cancer and breast cancer.
It delays ageing and reduces wrinkles by strengthening tissues, tightening mucosae and improving the structure of hair and nails.

 

COMPOUNDS:
ORGANIC LYCOPENE: the lycopene has strong antioxidant and anticancer properties. During the menopause, the lycopene contrasts bone density loss by preventing and reducing osteoporosis. The lycopene reduces cardiovascular risks (decreasing blood LDL cholesterol concentration and preventing its oxidation, reducing hypertension) and plays an important role in different cancer type prevention (digestive system cancer, liver cancer, breast cancer and skin cancer) and in the prevention of degenerative central nervous system diseases (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases); it may also contribute in contrasting some types of diabetes (diabetes mellitus), age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and skin ageing

Unlike commercial, synthetic or natural lycopene, obtained by chemical synthesis or by a chemical extraction process, the organic NATURMiO Prostate's lycopene does not contain any trace of toxic chemical solvent (pesticide free, dioxin-free, heavy metal free, PCB-free and chemical solvent free).
The organic lycopene is the only one patented 100% organic certified.
VITAMIN E: is the antioxidant par excellence and it protects the cell membranes’ lipids that are the main targets for free radicals. Vitamin E is also very active against the free radicals coming from oxygen. It is important to prevent arteriosclerosis, the risk of cardiovascular diseases, and of cancer. Vitamin E is essential for the correct functioning of the muscles and of the immune system.
VITAMIC C: is a water-soluble antioxidant vitamin, playing many important roles in human body. It is necessary in collagen and in bone cells synthesis.
VITAMIN D: supports absorption calcium in the intestine and fixing it in the bones.
RESVERATROL: is an antioxidant compound with oestrogen action, which is useful for the treatment of menopause disorders. Resveratrol contrasts both oxidative stress and cardiovascular risk, by reducing the total cholesterol and triglyceride amount, and by protecting the LDL and VLDL from oxidation. It increases nitric oxide (NO) production and gives a contribution in reducing hypertension. Furthermore, resveratrol has an anti-inflammatory and anti-ageing action.
ISOFLAVONES: are natural compounds of vegetable origin with oestrogenic properties, although it is lower than that of estradiol, the most important female oestrogen hormone. Ingestion of isoflavones progressively reduces heat flashes, sweating, and other disturbances of the menopause.
OMEGA 3 FATTY ACIDS: are important to reduce risk factors of degenerative diseases that may become more evident with the menopause, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia, and osteoporosis. Omega 3 fatty acids reduce the level of cholesterol and triglycerides preventing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. They regulate intercellular connections. They also interfere with the processes of immune and anti-inflammatory systems of all body cells.
MAGNESIUM: is an essential dietary mineral for the organism because it modulates nervous and muscular signals. Magnesium deficiency may cause restlessness, chronic fatigue and irritability. Magnesium also supports preservation of bone density and mass.
ALPHA LIPOIC ACID: is an antioxidant compound produced by the human body and able to prevent damages associated to free radicals. It plays a key role in the human cellular energy metabolism strengthening and completing the defensive lines of the other antioxidants against the free radicals. The Lipoic acid neutralizes reactive oxygen species and it is necessary for the regeneration of vitamic E, vitamic C and Glutathione (after oxidation).
OENOTHERA OIL (evening primrose oil): is a concentrate of unsaturated fatty acids (Linolenic acid) easing the symptoms related to premenstrual syndrome. It is also useful during the menopause to normalize the hormonal equilibrium such avoiding typical concomitant manifestations like heat flashes, weight gain, water retention, irritability, depressions. These fatty acids also help in case of eczemas and dermatitis, dry skin, erythema and scalp desquamation.

 

Naturmio MAN

 

NATURMiO Prostate


naturmio uomoDIETARY SUPPLEMENT FOR PROSTATE, with organic lycopene


From the age of 45, men may develop an undesirable increase of the prostate gland, caused by an inflammatory process that may eventually degenerate into cancer. Oxidative stress due to an excess of free radicals and inflammatory agents are critical factors for the development of prostatitis and prostate cancer.
Lycopene, antioxidant vitamins C and E, alpha lipoic acid, resveratrol, polyphenols, omega e fatty acids and zinc contained in NATURMiO are important for prevention and for treatment of prostate inflammation.

 

NATURMiO Prostate is a special supplement useful to:
• Preserve the prostate in good health, and for the treatment of the most common disturbances associated with prostatic inflammation, pollakisuria, urinary urgency, dribbling, incomplete emptying of the urinary bladder, and incapacity to urinate.
• Prevent the risk of cardiovascular diseases (decreasing the level of lipids and of cholesterol in the blood as well as hypertension).
NATURMiO provides an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and it has an anti-ageing effect reducing wrinkles and relaxed tissues.

 

COMPOUNDS:
LYCOPENE: has strong antioxidant and anticancer properties essential for the health of the prostate and to prevent cancer. The lycopene reduces cardiovascular risks (decreasing blood LDL cholesterol concentration and preventing its oxidation, reducing hypertension) and plays an important role in different cancer type prevention (digestive system cancer, liver cancer, breast cancer and skin cancer) and in the prevention of degenerative central nervous system diseases (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases); it may also contribute in contrasting some types of diabetes (diabetes mellitus), age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and skin aging.
Unlike commercial, synthetic or natural lycopene, obtained by chemical synthesis or by a chemical extraction process, the organic NATURMiO Prostate's Lycopene does not contain any trace of toxic chemical solvent (pesticide free, dioxin-free, heavy metal free, PCB-free and chemical solvent free). The organic lycopene is the only one patented 100% organic certified. Food containing even small quantities of pesticides and other toxic contaminants contribute to prostatic hyperplasia.

 

ZINC: is an antioxidant helping to keep prostate in good health, reducing prostatic hypertrophy and the connected symptoms of most patients. It plays a critical role in enzymatic function, immune defence system and reproductive health.

 

RESVERATROL AND PHOLYFENOLS: are micronutrients that have antioxidant and anticancer activities. Resveratrol and pholyfenols efficiently thwart prostatic cancer genesis and reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases reducing total cholesterol and triglycerides and protecting LDL and VLDL against oxidation. They stimulate the production of nitric oxide and contribute to decrease hypertension. Resveratrol has an anti-inflammatory effect.

 

VITAMIN E: is the antioxidant par excellence and it protects the cell membranes’ lipids that are the main targets for free radicals. Vitamin E is also very active against the free radicals coming from oxygen. It is important to prevent ateriosclerosis, the risk of cardiovascular diseases, and of cancer. Vitamin E is essential for the correct functioning of the muscles and of the immune system.

 

VITAMIC C: is a water-soluble antioxidant vitamin, playing many important roles in human body. It is necessary in collagen and in bone cells synthesis.

 

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID: is an antioxidant compound produced by the human body able to prevent damages associated to free radicals. It plays a key role in the human cellular energy metabolism strengthening and completing the defensive lines of the other antioxidants against the free radicals. The Lipoic acid neutralizes reactive oxygen species and it is necessary for the regeneration of vitamic E, vitamic C and Glutathione (after oxidation).

 

OMEGA 3 FATTY ACIDS: are of utmost importance for the prostate’s health. Ingestion of essential fatty acids (EPA) contributes significantly to the physiological function of the urinary system, to the reduction of prostatitis, and to slow down development and growth of prostatic cancers. Omega 3 fatty acids reduce the level of cholesterol and triglycerides preventing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. They regulate intercellular connections. They also interfere with the processes of immune and anti-inflammatory systems of all body cells.

DERMIO

DERMO-CLEANSING FLUID FOR BODY, HANDS AND ARMPITS, NATURAL ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTIMYCOTIC ACTION


DermioDermo-cleansing fluid for body, hands and armpits is an oily cleanser rich in natural active principles that does not contain any trace of water and preservatives, nickel tested and ultra-gentle, formulated with a 50% concentration of sweet almond oil and natural surfactants. It contains Tea Tree Oil (Melaleuca Alternifolia essential oil), a natural very effective antiseptic, antifungal, antibacterial and antiviral substance, particularly indicated in case of excessive sweating. It is enriched with organic lycopene encapsulated in wheat cerasomes, known to have a high antioxidant activity, and it is specifically formulated without Sodium Laureth Sulfate (LES free), to minimize irritation risk and the consequent decrease of the skin natural defence.
It is particularly recommended for:
• Allergies to nickel and synthetic preservatives contained in normal detergents and soaps
• Excessive sweating
• Particularly sharp and intense skin smell (i.e. armpits, feet, a.s.o.)
• Post-epilation of armpits and body
• Prevention of frequent folliculitis
• Enhancing hygiene in case of folliculitis and axillary dermatitis
• Cleansing the body during pregnancy, lactation and menopause
• Helping sudoriferous glands activity during puberty
• Anybody frequenting places with high mycosis risk such as gymnasiums, swimming pools, saunas, a.s.o. to prevent the infections
• Preventing and treating dandruff
• Seborrheic dermatitis
• Pruriginous skin rashes
• Baby intimate hygiene in case of diaper dermatitis, cradle cap and atopic dermatitis
• Preventing skin ageing


Natural active compounds:
• Sweet almond oil: moisturising, softening and soothing action, it improves skin elasticity
• Wheat germ oil: soothing, protecting and repairing action
• Tea Tree Oil (Melaleuca Alternifolia essential oil): antiseptic, antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral and strong deodorant action
• Triclosan: prevents bad smell without blocking natural transpiration and it has a gentle deodorant and antibacterial action
• Organic Lycopene encapsulated in wheat cerasomes: soothing, moisturising and antioxidant action, it improves skin elasticity and prevents skin ageing
• Oil-based surfactants: ultra-gentle, it has a non-irritating cleansing action and it does not alter skin's hydro-lipid balance

adOrganic Lycopene - Bibliography

 

AIDS


1. Melikian G, Mmiro F, Ndugwa C, Perry R, Jackson JB, Garrett E, Tielsch J, Semba RD. Department of Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA Relation of vitamin A and carotenoid status to growth failure and mortality among Ugandan infants with human immunodeficiency virus. Nutrition 2001 Jul-Aug;17(7-8):567-72 

2. Lan Y, Kumwenda N, Taha TE, Chiphangwi JD, Miotti PG, Mtimavalye L, Broadhead R, van der Hoeven L, Hoover DR, Semba RD Deparment of Opthalmology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Carotenoid status of pregnant women with and without HIV infection in Malawi. East Afr Med J 1999 Mar;76(3):133-7

3. Coodley GO, Coodley MK, Nelson HD Micronutrients in HIV-infected women. J Womens Health 4:303-311, 1995.

4. Periquet BA, Jammes NM, Lambert WE, Tricoire J, Moussa MM, Garcia J, Ghisolfi J, Thouvenot J Purpan Hospital, Toulouse, France. 
Micronutrient levels in HIV-1-infected children. AIDS 1995 Aug;9(8):887-893

5. Tang AM, Smit E, Semba RD, Shah N, Lyles CM, Li D, Vlahov D Department of Epidemiology, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University', Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Improved antioxidant status among HIV-infected injecting drug users on potent antiretroviral therapy. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2000 Apr 1;23(4):321-6
6.
7. Burger H, Kovacs A, Weiser B, Grimson R, Nachman S, Tropper P, van Bennekum AM, Elie MC, Blaner WS Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, USA. Maternal serum vitamin A levels are not associated with mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in the United States. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol 1997 Apr 1;14(4):321-326

 

 

LUNG CANCER



1) Arab L, Steck-Scott S, Fleishauer AT. Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Suite 2105E, Mcgavren Greenberg Building, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7435, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Lycopene and the lung. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 2002 Nov;227(10):894-9 



2) Kim DJ, Takasuka N, Nishino H, Tsuda H Department of Pathology, National Institute of Toxicology Research, Korea FDA, Seoul. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 
Chemoprevention of lung cancer by lycopene. Biofactors 2000;13(1-4):95-102



3) Garcia-Closas R, Agudo A, Gonzalez CA, Riboli E Research Unit, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain. 
Intake of specific carotenoids and flavonoids and the risk of lung cancer in women in Barcelona, Spain. Nutr Cancer 1998;32(3):154-8



4) Stefani ED, Boffetta P, Deneo-Pellegrini H, Mendilaharsu M, Carzoglio JC, Ronco A, Olivera L Registro Nacional de Cancer, Montevideo, Uruguay. 
Dietary antioxidants and lung cancer risk: a case-control study in Uruguay. Nutr Cancer 1999;34(1):100-10



5) Heber D Colorful cancer prevention: alpha-carotene, lycopene, and lung cancer. Am J Clin Nutr 2000 Oct;72(4):901-2 
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6) Michaud DS, Feskanich D, Rimm EB, Colditz GA, Speizer FE, Willett WC, Giovannucci E Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Intake of specific carotenoids and risk of lung cancer in 2 prospective US cohorts. Am J Clin Nutr 2000 Oct;72(4):990-7 Comment in: Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Oct;72(4):901-2



7) Voorrips LE, Goldbohm RA, Brants HA, van Poppel GA, Sturmans F, Hermus RJ, van den Brandt PA Department of Nutritional Epidemiology, TNO Nutrition and Food Research Institute, Zeist, The Netherlands. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it A prospective cohort study on antioxidant and folate intake and male lung cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2000 Apr;9(4):357-65



8) Ruano-Ravina A, Figueiras A, Freire-Garabal M, Barros-Dios JM. Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, c/ San Francisco s/n, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Antioxidant vitamins and risk of lung cancer. Curr Pharm Des. 2006;12(5):599-613. 



9) Levy J, Bosin E, Feldman B, Giat Y, Miinster A, Danilenko M, Sharoni Y Clinical Biochemistry Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. Lycopene is a more potent inhibitor of human cancer cell proliferation than either alpha-carotene or beta-carotene. Nutr Cancer 1995;24(3):257-266 



10) Jewell C, O'Brien NM Department of Nutrition, University College, Cork, Ireland. Effect of dietary supplementation with carotenoids on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in the liver, lung, kidney and small intestine of the rat. Br J Nutr 1999 Mar;81(3):235-42 



11) Guttenplan JB, Chen M, Kosinska W, Thompson S, Zhao Z, Cohen LA Division of Basic Sciences/Biochemistry, New York University, Dental Center, 345 E. 24th St., New York, 10100, NY, USA Effects of a lycopene-rich diet on spontaneous and benzo[a]pyrene induced mutagenesis in prostate, colon, and lung of the lac Z mouse. Cancer Lett 2001 Mar 10;164(1):1-6



12) Neuman I, Nahum H, Ben-Amotz A Department of Allergy, Hasharon Hospital, Golda Medical Center, Petach Tivka and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Israel.
Reduction of exercise-induced asthma oxidative stress by lycopene, a natural antioxidant. Allergy 2000 Dec;55(12):1184-9



13) Grievink L, de WAART FG, Schouten EG, Kok FJ Division of Human Nutrition and Epidemiology, Wageningen University and Research Center, Wageningen, The Netherlands. 
Serum carotenoids, alpha-tocopherol, and lung function among dutch elderly. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2000 Mar;161(3 Pt 1):790-5



14) Hecht SS, Kenney PM, Wang M, Trushin N, Agarwal S, Rao AV, Upadhyaya P University of Minnesota Cancer Center, Minneapolis 55455, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 
Evaluation of butylated hydroxyanisole, myo-inositol, curcumin, esculetin, resveratrol and lycopene as inhibitors of benzo[a]pyrene plus 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone-induced lung tumorigenesis in A/J mice. Cancer Lett 1999 Apr 1;137(2):123-30 



15) Yuan JM, Stram DO, Arakawa K, Lee HP, Yu MC. Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90033-0800, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Dietary cryptoxanthin and reduced risk of lung cancer: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 Sep;12(9):890-8.



16) Comstock GW, Alberg AJ, Huang HY, Wu K, Burke AE, Hoffman SC, Norkus EP, Gross M, Cutler RG, Morris JS, Spate VL, Helzlsouer KJ Department of Epidemiology, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. The risk of developing lung cancer associated with antioxidants in the blood: ascorbic acid, carotenoids, alpha-tocopherol, selenium, and total peroxyl radical absorbing capacity. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 1997 Nov;6(11):907-916



17) Jewell C, O'Brien NM Department of Nutrition, University College, Cork, Ireland. Effect of dietary supplementation with carotenoids on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in the liver, lung, kidney and small intestine of the rat. Br J Nutr 1999 Mar;81(3):235-42



18) Smith-Warner, S. A.; Pooling Project of Diet and Cancer Investigators; Mannisto, S.; Hunter, D. J. Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA 
Dietary carotenoids and lung cancer risk in a pooled analysis of cohort studies. American Journal of Epidemiology VOL. 153 NO. 11 Supplement June 1, 2001 PP. S119. June 13-16, 2001 Joint Meeting of the Society for Epidemiologic Research, American College of Epidemiology, Epidemiology Section of the American Public Health Association, and the Canadian Society for Epidemiology and Biostatistics



19) Rohan TE, Jain M, Howe GR, Miller AB. Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it A cohort study of dietary carotenoids and lung cancer risk in women (Canada). Cancer Causes Control 2002 Apr;13(3):231-7



20) Bohm F, Edge R, Burke M, Truscott TG. Meclinic Berlin, Friedrichstrasse 71, 10117, Berlin, Germany Dietary uptake of lycopene protects human cells from singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide - ROS components from cigarette smoke. J Photochem Photobiol B 2001 Nov 15;64(2-3):176-178



21) Schunemann HJ, Grant BJ, Freudenheim JL, Muti P, Browne RW, Drake JA, Klocke RA, Trevisan M. Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo; and Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Buffalo, New York. The Relation of Serum Levels of Antioxidant Vitamins C and E, Retinol and Carotenoids with Pulmonary Function in the General Population. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2001 Apr 1;163(5):1246-1255



22) Palozza P, Sheriff A, Serini S, Boninsegna A, Maggiano N, Ranelletti FO, Calviello G, Cittadini A. Institute of General Pathology, Catholic University, Rome. Lycopene induces apoptosis in immortalized fibroblasts exposed to tobacco smoke condensate through arresting cell cycle and down-regulating cyclin D1, pAKT and pBad. Apoptosis. 2005 Oct 3.



23) Schunemann HJ, McCann S, Grant BJ, Trevisan M, Muti P, Freudenheim JL. Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York, 207 Farber Hall, 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214-3000, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Lung function in relation to intake of carotenoids and other antioxidant vitamins in a population-based study. Am J Epidemiol 2002 Mar 1;155(5):463-71



24) Holick CN, Michaud DS, Stolzenberg-Solomon R, Mayne ST, Pietinen P, Taylor PR, Virtamo J, Albanes D. Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Dietary carotenoids, serum beta-carotene, and retinol and risk of lung cancer in the alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene cohort study. Am J Epidemiol 2002 Sep 15;156(6):536-47



25) Wang XD. Nutrition and Cancer Biology Laboratory, Jean Mayer U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111. Can smoke-exposed ferrets be utilized to unravel the mechanisms of action of lycopene? J Nutr. 2005 Aug;135(8):2053S-6S.

26) Hozawa A, Jacobs DR Jr, Steffes MW, Gross MD, Steffen LM, Lee DH. Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 55454, USA.
Associations of serum carotenoid concentrations with the development of diabetes and with insulin concentration: interaction with smoking: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2006 May 15;163(10):929-37. Epub 2006 Apr 5.



27) Ito Y, Wakai K, Suzuki K, Ozasa K, Watanabe Y, Seki N, Ando M, Nishino Y, Kondo T, Ohno Y, Tamakoshi A. Department of Public Health, Fujita Health University School of Health Sciences. Lung Cancer Mortality and Serum Levels of Carotenoids, Retinol, Tocopherols, and Folic Acid in Men and Women: a Case-Control Study Nested in the JACC Study. J Epidemiol. 2005;15 Suppl 2:S140-9.
28) Wood LG, Garg ML, Blake RJ, Garcia-Caraballo S, Gibson PG. Department Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, Locked Bag 1, Hunter Region Mail Centre, NSW, 2310, AUSTRALIA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Airway and circulating levels of carotenoids in asthma and healthy controls. J Am Coll Nutr. 2005 Dec;24(6):448-55. 



29) Falk B, Gorev R, Zigel L, Ben-Amotz A, Neuman I. Ribstein Center for Sports Medicine Sciences and Research, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 
Effect of lycopene supplementation on lung function after exercise in young athletes who complain of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction symptoms.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2005 Apr;94(4):480-5.



30) Ito Y, Wakai K, Suzuki K, Tamakoshi A, Seki N, Ando M, Nishino Y, Kondo T, Watanabe Y, Ozasa K, Ohno Y; JACC Study Group. Department of Public Health, Fujita Health University School of Health Sciences, 1-98 Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake-cho, Toyoake, Aichi 470-1192. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Serum carotenoids and mortality from lung cancer: a case-control study nested in the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) study. Cancer Sci 2003 Jan;94(1):57-63

31) Alberg AJ, Chen JC, Zhao H, Hoffman SC, Comstock GW, Helzlsouer KJ Department of Epidemiology, The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Household exposure to passive cigarette smoking and serum micronutrient concentrations. Am J Clin Nutr 2000 Dec;72(6):1576-82 - Comment in: Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Dec;72(6):1421-3



32) Wei W, Kim Y, Boudreau N Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio, 43404, USA. Association of smoking with serum and dietary levels of antioxidants in adults: NHANES III, 1988-1994. Am J Public Health 2001 Feb;91(2):258-64



33) Chopra M, O'Neill ME, Keogh N, Wortley G, Southon S, Thurnham DI Northern Ireland Centre for Diet and Health, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland BT52 1SA, United Kingdom. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Influence of increased fruit and vegetable intake on plasma and lipoprotein carotenoids and LDL oxidation in smokers and nonsmokers. Clin Chem 2000 Nov;46(11):1818-29



34) McGrath LT, Mallon P, Dowey L, Silke B, McClean E, McDonnell M, Devine A, Copeland S, Elborn S Department of Therapeutics and Pharmacology, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK. Oxidative stress during acute respiratory exacerbations in cystic fibrosis. Thorax 1999 Jun;54(6):518-523



35) Talwar D, Ha TK, Scott HR, Cooney J, Fell GS, O'Reilly DS, Lean ME, McMillan DC Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. 
Effect of inflammation on measures of antioxidant status in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Am J Clin Nutr 1997 Nov;66(5):1283-1285



36) Ochs-Balcom HM, Grant BJ, Muti P, Sempos CT, Freudenheim JL, Browne RW, McCann SE, Trevisan M, Cassano PA, Iacoviello L, Schunemann HJ. [1] 1Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA [2] 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA [3] 3Ireland Comprehensive Cancer Center at University Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. Antioxidants, oxidative stress, and pulmonary function in individuals diagnosed with asthma or COPD.
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37) Wakai K, Ando M, Ozasa K, Ito Y, Suzuki K, Nishino Y, Kuriyama S, Seki N, Kondo T, Watanabe Y, Ohno Y, Tamakoshi A. Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute. Updated Information on Risk Factors for Lung Cancer: Findings from the JACC Study. J Epidemiol. 2005;15 Suppl 2:S134-9. 



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40) Liu C, Lian F, Smith DE, Russell RM, Wang XD. Nutrition and Cancer Biology Laboratory, Jean Mayer United States Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts 02111. Lycopene Supplementation Inhibits Lung Squamous Metaplasia and Induces Apoptosis via Up-Regulating Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein 3 in Cigarette Smoke-exposed Ferrets. Cancer Res. 2003 Jun 15;63(12):3138-44. 



41) Kasagi S, Seyama K, Mori H, Souma S, Sato T, Akiyoshi T, Suganuma H, Fukuchi Y. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Tomato juice prevents from developing emphysema induced by chronic exposure to tobacco smoke in senescence-accelerated mouse P1 strain. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2005 Oct 7.



42) Reddy MK, Alexander-Lindo RL, Nair MG. Department of Horticulture, National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA. Relative inhibition of lipid peroxidation, cyclooxygenase enzymes, and human tumor cell proliferation by natural food colors. J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Nov 16;53(23):9268-73.



43) Lim PS, Wang NP, Lu TC, Wang TH, Hsu WM, Chan EC, Hung WR, Yang CC, Kuo IF, Wei YH. Department of Internal Medicine, Kuang Tien General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. Evidence for alterations in circulating low-molecular-weight antioxidants and increased lipid peroxidation in smokers on hemodialysis. Nephron 2001 Jun;88(2):127-33




44) Yuan JM, Ross RK, Chu XD, Gao YT, Yu MC. Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Prediagnostic levels of serum beta-cryptoxanthin and retinol predict smoking-related lung cancer risk in Shanghai, China. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2001 Jul;10(7):767-73



45) Rust P, Lehner P, Elmadfa I. Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Vienna, Austria. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Relationship between dietary intake, antioxidant status and smoking habits in female Austrian smokers. Eur J Nutr 2001 Apr;40(2):78-83



46) Farchi S, Forastiere F, Pistelli R, Baldacci S, Simoni M, Perucci CA, Viegi G. Agenzia di Sanita Pubblica, Regione Lazio, 00198 Rome [S. F., F. F., C. A. P.]. Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke Is Associated with Lower Plasma beta-Carotene Levels among Nonsmoking Women Married to a Smoker. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2001 Aug;10(8):907-909



47) Steck-Scott S, Arab L, Craft NE, Samet JM. 1Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Plasma and lung macrophage responsiveness to carotenoid supplementation and ozone exposure in humans. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 May 5 [Epub ahead of print] 



48) Ford ES, Mannino DM, Redd SC. Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Serum antioxidant concentrations among U.S. adults with self-reported asthma. J Asthma. 2004 Apr;41(2):179-87. 



49) Schock BC, Young IS, Brown V, Fitch PS, Shields MD, Ennis M. Departments of Clinical Biochemistry [B.C.S., I.S.Y., V.B., P.S.F., M.E.] and Child Health [P.S.F., M.D.S.], The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BJ, Northern Ireland, U.K. Antioxidants and Oxidative Stress in BAL Fluid of Atopic Asthmatic Children. Pediatr Res 2003 Mar;53(3):375-381



50) Dietrich M, Block G, Norkus EP, Hudes M, Traber MG, Cross CE, Packer L. School of Public Health (MD and GB) and the Department of Nutritional Sciences (MH), University of California, Berkeley. Smoking and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke decrease some plasma antioxidants and increase gamma-tocopherol in vivo after adjustment for dietary antioxidant intakes. Am J Clin Nutr 2003 Jan;77(1):160-6



51) Kristenson M, Kucinskiene Z, Schafer-Elinder L, Leanderson P, Tagesson C. Department of Health and Society, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden Lower serum levels of beta-carotene in Lithuanian men are accompanied by higher urinary excretion of the oxidative DNA adduct, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. The LiVicordia study. Nutrition 2003 Jan;19(1):11-5

 

 

PROSTATE CANCER



1) Ansari M, Ansari S. Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Urology and Renal transplantation, Rae Breli Road, Lucknow-UP (226014), India. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Urology and Renal transplantation, Rae Breli Road, Lucknow-UP (226014), India. Lycopene and prostate cancer. Future Oncol. 2005 Jun;1(3):425-430. 

2) Stacewicz-Sapuntzakis M, Bowen PE. Department of Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 West Taylor St. Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Role of lycopene and tomato products in prostate health. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2005 May 30;1740(2):202-5. Epub 2005 Mar 13. 

3) Siler U, Herzog A, Spitzer V, Seifert N, Denelavas A, Hunziker PB, Barella L, Hunziker W, Lein M, Goralczyk R, Wertz K. - DSM Nutritional Products Ltd., Human Nutrition and Health, Basel, Switzerlandand. Lycopene effects on rat normal prostate and prostate tumor tissue. J Nutr. 2005 Aug;135(8):2050S-2S. 

4) Kaplan SA - Lycopene: modes of action to promote prostate health. J Urol. 2005 Aug;174(2):679; discussion 679.

5) Mohanty NK, Saxena S, Singh UP, Goyal NK, Arora RP. Department of Urology, V.M. Medical College & Safdarjang Hospital, New Delhi, India. Lycopene as a chemopreventive agent in the treatment of high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia. Urol Oncol. 2005 Nov-Dec;23(6):383-5. 

6) Guns ES, Cowell SP. - Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Canada. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Drug Insight: lycopene in the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. Nat Clin Pract Urol. 2005 Jan;2(1):38-43.

7) Fraser ML, Lee AH, Binns CW. Curtin University of Technology, School of Public Health, GPO Box U 1987, Perth WA 6845, Australia. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Lycopene and prostate cancer: emerging evidence Expert Rev Anticancer Ther. 2005 Oct;5(5):847-54.

8) Kirsh VA, Mayne ST, Peters U, Chatterjee N, Leitzmann MF, Dixon LB, Urban DA, Crawford ED, Hayes RB. Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. A prospective study of lycopene and tomato product intake and risk of prostate cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Jan;15(1):92-8. 

9) Everson KM, McQueen CE. Drug Information Center, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 64108, USA. Lycopene for prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2004 Aug 1;61(15):1562-6. 

10) Barber NJ, Barber J. Department of Urology, St George's Hospital, London, UK. Lycopene and prostate cancer. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2002 Mar;5(1):6-12. 
PROSTATE CANCER AND PROSTATIC DISEASES: (2002) 5, 6-12. DOI: 10.1038/sj/pcan/4500560

11) Hwang ES, Bowen PE. - Center for Agricultural Biomaterial, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Shillim-dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742, Korea. Effects of lycopene and tomato paste extracts on DNA and lipid oxidation in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. Biofactors. 2005;23(2):97-105

12) Bowen PE - Department of Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612. Selection of surrogate endpoint biomarkers to evaluate the efficacy of lycopene/tomatoes for the prevention/progression of prostate cancer. J Nutr. 2005 Aug;135(8):2068S-70S. 

13) Gann PH - Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611. Intermediate biomarkers of lycopene/tomato effects in high-risk prostatic tissue.
J Nutr. 2005 Aug;135(8):2065S-7S. 

14) Tang L, Jin T, Zeng X, Wang JS. - Department of Environmental Toxicology and The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University System, Lubbock, TX;
Lycopene inhibits the growth of human androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro and in BALB/c nude mice. J Nutr. 2005 Feb;135(2):287-90. 

15) Chan JM, Gann PH, Giovannucci EL. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 1600 Divisadero St, Box 1695, San - Francisco, CA 94143-1695, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Role of diet in prostate cancer development and progression. J Clin Oncol. 2005 Nov 10;23(32):8152-60. 

16) Ansari MS, Gupta NP - Department of Urology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029, India. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Lycopene: a novel drug therapy in hormone refractory metastatic prostate cancer. Urol Oncol. 2004 Sep-Oct;22(5):415-20. 

17) Obermuller-Jevic UC,Olano-Martin E, Corbacho AM, Eiserich JP,van der Vliet A, Valacchi G, Cross CE, Packer L Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. Lycopene inhibits the growth of normal human prostate epithelial cells in vitro. J Nutr. 2003 Nov;133(11):3356-60.

18) Hwang ES, Bowen PE. - Department of Human Nutrition, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL 61801, USA. Effects of tomato paste extracts on cell proliferation, cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. Biofactors. 2005;23(2):75-84. 

19) Chang S, Erdman JW Jr, Clinton SK, Vadiveloo M, Strom SS, Yamamura Y, Duphorne CM, Spitz MR, Amos CI, Contois JH, Gu X, Babaian RJ, Scardino PT, Hursting SD.
Relationship between plasma carotenoids and prostate cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2005;53(2):127-34.

20) Kristal AR, Schenk JM. - Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109-4686. Directions for future epidemiological research in lycopene and prostate cancer risk. J Nutr. 2005 Aug;135(8):2037S-9S. 

21) Giovannucci E. - Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 and Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115. Tomato Products, Lycopene, and Prostate Cancer: A Review of the Epidemiological Literature. J Nutr. 2005 Aug;135(8):2030S-2031S. 

22) Giovannucci E, Clinton SK - Harvard Medical School, Channing Laboratory, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. Tomatoes, lycopene, and prostate cancer. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1998 Jun;218(2):129-139 

23) Giovannucci E, Ascherio A, Rimm EB, Stampfer MJ, Colditz GA, Willett WC Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Intake of carotenoids and retinol in relation to risk of prostate cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst 1995 Dec 6;87(23):1767-1776 

24) Pastori M, Pfander H, Boscoboinik D, Azzi A Institute for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Bern, Bern, CH-3012, Switzerland. Lycopene in association with alpha-tocopherol inhibits at physiological concentrations proliferation of prostate carcinoma cells. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1998 Sep 29;250(3):582-5 

25) Gann PH, Ma J, Giovannucci E, Willett W, Sacks FM, Hennekens CH, Stampfer MJ Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Illinois 60611, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Lower prostate cancer risk in men with elevated plasma lycopene levels: results of a prospective analysis. Cancer Res 1999 Mar 15;59(6):1225-30 

26) Rao AV, Fleshner N, Agarwal S - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, ON, Canada. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it “Serum and tissue lycopene and biomarkers of oxidation in prostate cancer patients: a case-control study”. Nutr Cancer 1999;33(2):159-64 

27) Norrish AE, Jackson RT, Sharpe SJ, Skeaff CM - Department of Community Health, University of Auckland, New Zealand. Prostate cancer and dietary carotenoids. Am J Epidemiol 2000 Jan 15;151(2):119-23 

28) Lu QY, Hung JC, Heber D, Go VL, Reuter VE, Cordon-Cardo C, Scher HI, Marshall JR, Zhang ZF. Center for Human Nutrition, University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Inverse associations between plasma lycopene and other carotenoids and prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2001 Jul;10(7):749-56

29) Matlaga BR, Hall MC, Stindt D, Torti FM. Department of Urology and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Response of hormone refractory prostate cancer to lycopene. J Urol 2001 Aug;166(2):613

30) Bowen, P. E. University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, 60612: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , USA Tomato sauce supplementation reduces DNA damage in men with prostate cancer. Abstracts of Papers American Chemical Society VOL. 222 NO. 1-2,2001 PP. AGFD129. American Chemical Society CONFERENCE DATE August 26-30, 2001 CONFERENCE TITLE: 222nd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society


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32) Matos HR, Marques SA, Gomes OF, Silva AA, Heimann JC, Di Mascio P, Medeiros MH. Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao, SE, Brasil. Lycopene and ss-carotene protect in vivo iron-induced oxidative stress damage in rat prostate. Braz J Med Biol Res. 2006 Feb;39(2):203-10. Epub 2006 Feb 2. 

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39) Segev Y, Nativ O-Urology Department, The Bnei Zion Medical Center, Haifa. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Nutrition and pharmacological treatment for prevention of prostate cancer. Harefuah. 2006 Jan;145(1):47-51, 76-7. 

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41) Tavani A, Longoni E, Bosetti C, Maso LD, Polesel J, Montella M, Ramazzotti V, Negri E, Franceschi S, Vecchia CL. - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche "Mario Negri", Milan, Italy. Intake of Selected Micronutrients and the Risk of Surgically Treated Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Case-Control Study from Italy. Eur Urol. 2005 Dec 28. 

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56) Bosetti C, Talamini R, Montella M, Negri E, Conti E, Franceschi S, La Vecchia C. Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche "Mario Negri," Milan, Italy. Retinol, carotenoids and the risk of prostate cancer: A case-control study from Italy. Int J Cancer. 2004 Nov 20;112(4):689 - Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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65) Kim HS, Bowen P, Chen L, Duncan C, Ghosh L, Sharifi R, Christov K. Department of Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 W. Taylor, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Effects of tomato sauce consumption on apoptotic cell death in prostate benign hyperplasia and carcinoma. Nutr Cancer. 2003;47(1):40-7. 

66) Forbes K, Gillette K, Sehgal I. - Center for Protease Research, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58105, USA. Lycopene increases urokinase receptor and fails to inhibit growth or connexin expression in a metastatically passaged prostate cancer cell line: a brief communication. Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2003 Sep;228(8):967-71. 

67) Boileau TW, Liao Z, Kim S, Lemeshow S, Erdman JW Jr, Clinton SK. Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (TWMB, JWE). J Natl Cancer Inst. 2003 Nov 5;95(21):1578-86. Prostate carcinogenesis in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU)-testosterone-treated rats fed tomato powder, lycopene, or energy-restricted diets.

68) Pohar KS, Gong MC, Bahnson R, Miller EC, Clinton SK. Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, 4841 UHC, 456 West 10th Avenue, OH 43210, Columbus, USA, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tomatoes, lycopene and prostate cancer: a clinician's guide for counseling those at risk for prostate cancer. World J Urol. 2003 May;21(1):9-14. Epub 2003 Mar 22. 

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108) Imaida K, Tamano S, Kato K, Ikeda Y, Asamoto M, Takahashi S, Nir Z, Murakoshi M, Nishino H, Shirai T 1st Department of Pathology Nagoya City University Medical School, 1-Kawasumi, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601, Japan. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it - Lack of chemopreventive effects of lycopene and curcumin on experimental rat prostate carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis 2001 Mar;22(3):467-72

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111) Schroder, Fritz H.; Kranse, Ries; Dijk, Mathilde A.; Blom, Jan H. M.; van Kemenade, Monique; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Tijburg, Lianne M.; Weststrate, Jan A. - Rotterdam, Netherlands Dietary intervention in prostate cancer patients. Results of a randomized, double blind placebo controlled cross-over study. Journal of Urology VOL. 165 NO. 5 Supplement May, 2001 PP. 65. June 02-07, 2001 Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association, Inc. 

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122) Gallagher RP, Kutynec CL. Clinical Professor, Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Diet, micronutrients and prostate cancer: a review of the evidence. Can J Urol. 1997 Jun;4(2 Supp 1):22-27. 

123) Ansari MS, Gupta NP, Hemal AK. Department of Urology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi-110029, India. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Chemoprevention of carcinoma prostate: a review. Int Urol Nephrol. 2002;34(2):207-14. 

124) Clinton SK, Emenhiser C, Schwartz SJ, Bostwick DG, Williams AW, Moore BJ, Erdman JW Jr Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115-6084, USA. cis-trans lycopene isomers, carotenoids, and retinol in the human prostate. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 1996 Oct;5(10):823-833

 

 

MALE INFERTILITY


1. Gupta NP, Kumar R. Department of Urology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, 110029, New Delhi, India. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 
Lycopene therapy in idiopathic male infertility--a preliminary report. Int Urol Nephrol. 2002;34(3):369-72.
2. Palan P, Naz R Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA. Changes in various antioxidant levels in human seminal plasma related to immunoinfertility. Arch Androl 1996 Mar;36(2):139-143
3. Atessahin A, Karahan I, Turk G, Gur S, Yilmaz S, Ceribasi AO. Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Firat University, 23119 Elazig, Turkey. Protective role of lycopene on cisplatin-induced changes in sperm characteristics, testicular damage and oxidative stress in rats. Reprod Toxicol. 2005 Jun 23;
4. Oborná I, Fingerová H, Hajdúch M, Svobodová M, Brezinová J, Vostálová J, Novotný J. [Lycopene therapy in male infertility]Ceska Gynekol. 2007 Oct;72(5):326-9. Review. Czech. PMID: 18175515 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
5. Goyal A, Chopra M, Lwaleed BA, Birch B, Cooper AJ.The effects of dietary lycopene supplementation on human seminal plasma.BJU Int. 2007 Jun;99(6):1456-60. Epub 2007 Mar 2. PMID: 17484766 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

LYCOPENE AND CERVICAL CANCER


1. Nahum A, Zeller L, Danilenko M, Prall OW, Watts CK, Sutherland RL, Levy J,Sharoni Y. Dept. of Clinical Biochemistry Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University 
of the Negev and Soroka Medical Center of Kupat Holim, Beer-Sheva, Israel. Lycopene inhibition of IGF-induced cancer cell growth depends on the level of cyclin D1. 
Eur J Nutr. 2006 Mar 24. 

2. Garcia-Closas R, Castellsague X, Bosch X, Gonzalez CA. Cancer Epidemiology and Registration Unit, Institut Catala d'Oncologia (ICO), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. The role of diet and nutrition in cervical carcinogenesis: A review of recent evidence. Int J Cancer. 2005 May 23 

3. Muzandu K, El Bohi K, Shaban Z, Ishizuka M, Kazusaka A, Fujita S. Laboratory of Toxicology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku N18W9, Sapporo 060-0818, Japan. Lycopene and beta-carotene ameliorate catechol estrogen-mediated DNA damage. Jpn J Vet Res. 2005 Feb;52(4):173-84. 

4. Kim YT, Kim JW, Choi JS, Kim SH, Choi EK, Cho NH. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. Relation between deranged antioxidant system and cervical neoplasia. Int J Gynecol Cancer.2004 Sep-Oct;14(5):889-95 

5. La Vecchia C. Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Eritrea 62, 20157 Milan, Italy. garimoldi@marionegri.itTomatoes, lycopene intake, and digestive tract and female hormone-related neoplasms. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 2002 Nov;227(10):860-3 

6. Levy J, Bosin E, Feldman B, Giat Y, Miinster A, Danilenko M, Sharoni Y Clinical Biochemistry Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. Lycopene is a more potent inhibitor of human cancer cell proliferation than either alpha-carotene or beta-carotene. Nutr Cancer 1995;24(3):257-266 

7. World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research Food Nutrition and Prevention of Cancer: a global perspective. American Institute for Cancer Research, Washington DC, 1997 

8. VanEenwyk J, Davis FG, Bowen PE Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois, Chicago. Dietary and serum carotenoids and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Int J Cancer 1991 Apr 22;48(1):34-38 

9. Palan PR, Chang CJ, Mikhail MS, Ho GY, Basu J, Romney SL Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Plasma concentrations of micronutrients during a nine-month clinical trial of beta-carotene in women with precursor cervical cancer lesions. Nutr Cancer 1998;30(1):46-52 

10. Kantesky PA, Gammon MD, Mandelblatt J, Zhang ZF, Ramsey E, Dnistrian A, Norkus EP, Wright TC Jr Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia 19104, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Dietary intake and blood levels of lycopene: association with cervical dysplasia among non-Hispanic, black women. Nutr Cancer 1998;31(1):31-40 

11. Schiff, M. A.; Patterson, R. E.; Becker, T. M.; Baumgartner, R. N. University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA Serum carotenoids and risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in southwestern American Indian women. American Journal of Epidemiology VOL. 153 NO. 11 Supplement June 1, 2001 PP. S104. 
June 13-16, 2001 Joint Meeting of the Society for Epidemiologic Research, American College of Epidemiology, Epidemiology Section of the American Public Health Association, and the Canadian Society for Epidemiology and Biostatistics. 

12. Cramer, Daniel W.; Harlow, Bernard L.; Kuper, Hannah; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda Ob-Gyn Epidemiology Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , USA Carotenoids, antioxidants and ovarian cancer risk in pre- and postmenopausal women. International Journal of Cancer VOL. 94 NO. 1 1 October, 2001 PP. 128-134. 

13. Nagata C, Shimizu H, Yoshikawa H, Noda K, Nozawa S, Yajima A, Sekiya S, Sugimori H, Hirai Y, Kanazawa K, Sugase M, Kawana T Department of Public Health, Gifu University School of Medicine, Japan. Serum carotenoids and vitamins and risk of cervical dysplasia from a case-control study in Japan. Br J Cancer 1999 Dec;81(7):1234-7

14. Schiff MA, Patterson RE, Baumgartner RN, Masuk M, van Asselt-King L, Wheeler CM, Becker TM. University of Washington, Department of Epidemiology, Seattle, Washington 98115 [M. A. S.]. Serum carotenoids and risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in southwestern american Indian women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2001 Nov;10(11):1219-22

15. Peng YM; Peng YS; CHilders JM; Hatch KD; Roe DJ; Lin YG; Lin P Peng YM, Univ Arizona, Arizona Canc Ctr, 1515 N Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 USA.
Concentrations of carotenoids, tocopherols, and retinol in paired plasma and cervical tissue of patients with cervical cancer, precancer, and noncancerous diseases CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION 1998, Vol 7, Iss 4, pp 347-350

16. Palan PR, Mikhail MS, Goldberg GL, Basu J, Runowicz CD, Romney SL Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York 10461, USA. Plasma levels of beta-carotene, lycopene, canthaxanthin, retinol, and alpha- and tau-tocopherol in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer. Clin Cancer Res 1996 Jan;2(1):181-5

17. Sedjo RL, Roe DJ, Abrahamsen M, Harris RB, Craft N, Baldwin S, Giuliano AR. Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85724, USA. Vitamin A, carotenoids, and risk of persistent oncogenic human papillomavirus infection. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2002 Sep;11(9):876-84

18. Batieha AM, Armenian HK, Norkus EP, Morris JS, Spate VE, Comstock GW Department of Epidemiology, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205. Serum micronutrients and the subsequent risk of cervical cancer in a population-based nested case-control study.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 1993 Jul;2(4):335-339

19. Potischman N, Herrero R, Brinton LA, Reeves WC, Stacewicz-Sapuntzakis M, Jones CJ, Brenes MM, Tenorio F, de Britton RC, Gaitan E Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. A case-control study of nutrient status and invasive cervical cancer. II. Serologic indicators.
Am J Epidemiol 1991 Dec 1;134(11):1347-1355

20. Potischman N, Hoover RN, Brinton LA, Swanson CA, Herrero R, Tenorio F, de Britton RC, Gaitan E, Reeves WC - Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892. The relations between cervical cancer and serological markers of nutritional status. Nutr Cancer 1994;21(3):193-201 

21. Giuliano AR, Papenfuss M, Nour M, Canfield LM, Schneider A, Hatch K Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, Tucson 85724, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 
Antioxidant nutrients: associations with persistent human papillomavirus infection. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 1997 Nov;6(11):917-923

22. Goodman MT, Kiviat N, McDuffie K, Hankin JH, Hernandez B, Wilkens LR, Franke A, Kuypers J, Kolonel LN, Nakamura J, Ing G, Branch B, Bertram CC, Kamemoto L, Sharma S, Killeen J The association of plasma micronutrients with the risk of cervical dysplasia in Hawaii CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION 7: (6) 537-544 1998

23. McCann SE, Freudenheim JL, Marshall JR, Brasure JR, Swanson MK, Graham S Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, 14214, USA. Diet in the epidemiology of endometrial cancer in western New York (United States). Cancer Causes Control 2000 Dec;11(10):965-74

24. Nahum A, Hirsch K, Danilenko M, Watts CK, Prall OW, Levy J, Sharoni Y. Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and Soroka Medical Center of Kupat Holim, Beer-Sheva, Israel. Lycopene inhibition of cell cycle progression in breast and endometrial cancer cells is associated with reduction in cyclin D levels and retention of p27(Kip1) in the cyclin E-cdk2 complexes. Oncogene 2001 Jun 7;20(26):3428-36

25. Jain MG, Rohan TE, Howe GR, Miller AB. Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 
A cohort study of nutritional factors and endometrial cancer. Eur J Epidemiol 2000;16(10):899-905.

26. Goodman MT, McDuffie K, Hernandez B, Hankin JH, Wilkens LR, Franke AA, Kolonel LN, Kuypers J, Kiviat N, Bertram CC, Kessel B, Sunoo C, Nakamura J, Killeen J. Etiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, HI 96813, USA. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it The Association of Plasma Micronutrients with the Risk of Cervical Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance (ASCUS). Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2000;1(3):227-235

 

Malucrè – Description

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Malucrè Organic Natural Spa project aims to satisfy 2 needs:


• Beauty, as the Essence of Wellness (addressed to Malucrè's client)
• Start a new business opportunity to earn money fast and make sure profits (addressed to chemists, doctors and operators working in medical field)

 

Malucrè Organic Natural Spa is a new concept of wellness centre, a sort of “Beauty factory”, a “Beauty Laboratory”!
It is tailored to meet the investor’s needs, according to the location, his goals and his financial means.
No aspect is left to chance, starting from the planning stage.
An economic evaluation and an action plan will be developed considering the place where Malucrè Spa will be located.
We generally work on the planning stage, we give advice based on market surveys, we arrange start-up events and business development activities inside Malucrè and we continuously train staff.
On request, we can provide all the financial services needed to start up a new Malucrè Organic Natural Spa.
Our main goal is to make your business activity immediately successful and satisfying for your clients.


Malucré - Contact

 

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For any information, please contact

 

SIRTON MEDICARE SpA
2, Via Lanzone
Milan – Italy

T: +39 02 877834
F: +39 02 72093517

 

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Organic Lycopene - What is it ?

 

Organic lycopene differs from both synthetic and natural lycopene in terms of quality and production technology, which is highly innovative and clean.

Organic lycopene has the following characteristics:

  • is 100% natural and organic ICEA certified
  • absence of toxicity
  • improved natural bioavailability
  • improved antioxidant and anticancer activity


ORGANIC LYCOPENE: 100% NATURAL AND ORGANIC ICEA CERTIFIED

Organic lycopene is extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) from red-ripe tomato matrices (not skins or other derived wastes). The extract is composed by a mixture of natural compounds, including, in addition to lycopene, antioxidants, vitamins, amino acids and other compounds that are very important for human health.

These liposoluble compounds that are extracted with lycopene are the following: carotenoids ( b -carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin), vitamins (A, E, D, K), essential amino acids (alanine, leucine, trypthofan), polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6), phospholipids.

Organic lycopene is obtained by extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) from organic certified red-ripe tomatoes. This process does not involve the use of chemical solvents, so the finished product is solvent-free, 100% natural and organic certified ICEA. 


ORGANIC LYCOPENE: ABSENCE OF TOXICITY

Organic lycopene is obtained from organic red-ripe tomatoes certified ICEA. Tomatoes are pesticides-free, dioxins-free, heavy metals-free, OGM-free.

Organic lycopene is obtained by a cold extraction process based on an exclusively physic principle that does not involve any chemical reaction.

Because this procedure does not involve the use of toxic chemical solvents, the finished product is:

  • solvent-free (both in crystal structure and on the surface)
  • toxic reaction by-products-free (oxidation and other reaction intermediates)
  • toxic impurity-free (industrial solvents are not pure and may contain very toxic impurities)

Organic lycopene is the unique lycopene 100% natural without any form of toxicity.


ORGANIC LYCOPENE: IMPROVED BIOAVAILABILITY

In a nutritional supplement, lycopene bioavailability value is usually different from lycopene content. Bioavailability is an important parameter for a nutritional supplement, as it is an evaluation tool of its efficacy and action. Bioavailability is used to describe the quantity of lycopene (or any drug) that reaches the systemic circulation and is available at the site of action. The exceeding molecules are removed from the body.

Lycopene bioavailability depends on different factors:

  • lycopene molecular structure, such as physical state, crystal dimensions, isomeric configurations
  • physical and chemical properties of the lycopene mixture, such as lipid content, β-carotene content, uniformity of the extract, lycopene dosage


Lycopene Molecular structure: physical state

Lycopene bioavailability is highly influenced by the crystalline state.

Synthetic lycopene has a purity of 90-95%, it is in the form of large and regular crystals obtained after crystallization from a solution in chemical solvents and with low impurities content. Natural lycopene is obtained after crystallization from a solution in chemical solvents and with higher impurities content that is englobed in the crystal structure. The final lycopene has a purity of approximately 50-60% and it is in the form of small, dirty and not very regular crystals. Organic lycopene is present in the extract as a viscose solution in lipids which are co-extracted with it and it is not in a crystalline and/or amorphous state like synthetic and natural lycopene.

The lycopene absorption and passage into the systemic circulation depends on crystal stability, organic lycopene being already in solution is promptly absorbed and available. Organic lycopene represents the best form for its assimilation because is fundamentally not present in a crystalline state.


Lycopene molecular structure: crystals dimension

Lycopene bioavailability depends on the dimension of crystals. Recent studies demonstrated that smaller crystals are more easily dissolved in the human body and hence absorbed more rapidly than larger ones (500 nm crystals are 30% more absorbed than 5 mm ones).


Lycopene molecular structure: isomeric configuration

In nature, lycopene trans -form is more abundant (>90%) than cis -form, but in human tissues this ratio is the opposite (cis -isomer is > 60%).  The cis -form is, in fact, more bioavailable due to a reduced ability to form large crystals with respect to the trans -form . The isomerization from trans - cis could take place during the extraction process or during digestive processes. The two isomeric forms have the same biological activity, but cis -form is more absorbed in human tissues than the trans -one. A higher cis/trans ratio is strictly connected to a higher bioavailability. Organic lycopene has a cis / trans ratio 10-20-fold higher than the ones of synthetic and natural lycopene.

Physical and chemical properties of the lycopene mixture: lipid content    

Carotenoids are absorbed by the human digestive system with the same emulsification mechanism that allows lipid assimilation. That is why lycopene-based supplements contain a high quantity of lipids. Since lipids are important for the extraction of carotenoids from food and for the production of micelles/emulsions through which carotenoids are absorbed by enterocytes and so transferred to tissues.

Carotenoids are passively absorbed with lipids.

Their absorption depends also on their prompt release from food. The presence of oils or fats accelerates this process promoting the solubilisation of the carotenoid crystals enclosed in foods. Since lipids improve carotenoid absorption at the intestinal level, lycopene containing nutritional supplements include high percentages of vegetable oils. Moreover the absence.

Synthetic and natural lycopene can be used in nutritional supplements only diluted with vegetable oils, as high concentration and purity are strictly connected to very low chemical stability and bioavailability. Lycopene is diluted and stabilized by adding vegetable oils, preservatives and other additives. The final concentration of lycopene in nutritional supplements could be in a very large range, from 0,1% up to 10%.

Organic lycopene could be used itself as nutritional supplement because it has a high natural bioavailability. Organic lycopene does not need any form of dilution or solubilisation with external oils to enhance the absorption of lipids, as it happens for synthetic or natural lycopene, because lipids come directly from the co-extracted vegetable oil.

The extraction process by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) allows to obtain an extract, in which lycopene is uniformly solubilised in the co-extracted vegetable oil. In fact, this procedure avoids also the formation of large and stable lycopene crystals with great advantage for lycopene bioavailability.

Physical and chemical properties of the lycopene mixture: β-carotene content   

Organic lycopene contains also several carotenoids extracted from tomatoes, such as b-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, astaxanthin, phytofluene.

Recent studies have demonstrated that lycopene bioavailability is enhanced by the presence of b-carotene.

Physical and chemical properties of the lycopene mixture: concentration uniformity of the extract.

The organic lycopene extract is characterized by an elevated concentration uniformity of lycopene.

The absence of lycopene homogeneity in the lipids mixture or the presence of large and stable crystals could reduce lycopene absorption and consequently the efficacy of the product.

As lycopene can be in crystalline and/or partially amorphous state, natural or synthetic-based supplement can have products areas where the active principles is more concentrated and this non homogeneous state reduces absorption efficiency.

Physical and chemical properties of the lycopene mixture: lycopene dosage

Lycopene bioavailability is not directly proportional to its content in the nutritional supplement. 

For commercial reasons, synthetic or natural lycopene-based supplements may have a higher-than-needed lycopene dosage. This fact can be negative. In fact, a higher concentration of lycopene in the final product can reduce the efficiency of the absorption process and its antioxidant activity instead of increasing them.

Lycopene suggested dosage is different in several countries, but average daily dose is 2.5 mg/die, even if recent studies suggest 7.0 mg/die.

Organic lycopene in the supplement has a dosage of 4.5 mg/capsule.


ORGANIC LYCOPENE: HIGHER ANTIOXIDANT AND ANTITUMORAL ACTIVITY

The extraction process, by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) or by chemical solvents, is not selective, as it gives:

Lycopene

Other compounds

The “other compounds” are very important for health and include: antioxidants such as vitamin E, carotenoids (b-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, astaxanthin, etc.), polyphenols, vitamin K, essential amino acids (alanine, leucine, tryptophan), polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6), phospholipids and other compounds.

Natural lycopene is obtained by a process that leads up to high percentages of impurities and extraction chemical solvents. This product needs further purification steps, in order to reduce the toxicity of the final product, but the purification involve also the loss of other important antioxidants, present in the raw materials.

Organic lycopene has a high antioxidant activity. It is a mixture of lycopene and other compounds that work in synergy to give a stronger and more effective antioxidant action.

Tomatoes contain higher antioxidant compounds than lycopene, so their antioxidant activity is very important. Recent studies demonstrate that, on equal concentrations, a solution of organic lycopene exhibits an antioxidant and anticancer activity at least 100-fold higher than that of a solution of pure lycopene (synthetic or natural).

This is confirmed by FDA studies that underlined that, although a regular consumption of fresh tomatoes (or tomato derivatives) may reduce the incidence of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases, the same preventive effects were not evidenced by supplying dietary supplements containing pure lycopene. This suggests that the optimal biological activity of lycopene is reached only in the presence of other natural molecules contained in the tomatoes which may act synergistically.


Summary table of synthetic, natural and organic lycopene characteristics

 

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